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Exploring Poetry: The Diamanté Poem

Exploration of Poetry: Diamante.

The diamante poem is Italian for the word "diamond" and is an un-rhymed seven lined poem that has a specific diamond shape upon completion. The seven lines create one stanza, which completes the poem. Each line has a specific rule for the form throughout.

Line One: Noun or subject.
Line Two: Two Adjectives describing that noun or subject matter.
Line Three: Three words, all ending in "ing" describing the subject matter.
Line Four: Four words in total. The first two words describing the subject, then two contrasting words about the antonym/synonym
Line Five: Three words, all ending in "ing" describing the antonym/synonym
Line Six: Two adjectives describing the antonym/synonym
Line Seven: The Antonym/synonym for the subject.

As you can see, there is a shift in the middle of the poem which begins the antonym phase. The last word-line seven-will be the antonym of line one.

Think of it like this:

Lines 1 - 3: Word that states and describes itself which is the antonym of lines 5-7.
Line 4: Shifting of the poem.
Lines 5 - 7: Word that states and describes itself which is the antonym of lines 1-3.

I think of this poem as a piece of paper; I fold it up at line 4 and the two halves create a point where the two words are opposite of themselves, but somehow in the middle they create a connection for the reader.

Example


Rain
humid, damp
refreshing, dripping, splattering
wet, slippery, cold, slushy
sliding, melting, freezing
frigid, icy
Snow

by Marie Summers, (2000)



-brr

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